Annotated BibliographySeneca College

Social Anxiety and Perceived Social Support: Gender Differences and the Mediating Role of Communication Styles

 

Summary

Social anxiety and low perceived social support may be linked to communication styles.There is also a difference between men and women in their perception of social support, their social anxiety, and their communication skills.We investigated the impact of gender and communication styles on the relationship between social anxiety and perceived social support in this study. An online survey was administered to college students. Lower expressiveness was related with social anxiety among both men and women. The perception of social support by men is lower when precision is low; low verbal aggression and high emotionality are related to low social anxiety among women. Individuals who experience social anxiety may find that therapy provides an environment where they can develop skills in communicating and increasing perceived social support through their use.

There is a need for more research to determine how perceived social support and social anxiety are related, as well as how they differ by gender. By enhancing individuals’ understanding of the impact of social anxiety on their perceptions of availability which has support socially, possible interventions can be suggested. In this study, as the mediators, relation between the perceived support socially and social anxiety styles of communication is were identified, how the gender is affected is also discussed (Barnett, et al., 2021).

CRAP analysis

This journal article has been published in 2021. This article is having the updated information. By the updated information we can get and ensure the latest versions of information. As much the information is updated as it will be easy for the readers to gain knowledge from this source. Barnett, M. D. is a board-certified physician in Diagnostic Imaging and Interventional Radiology and one of only a handful of physicians board-certified in Lifestyle Medicine. This journal states, about (Social Anxiety and Perceived Social Support: Gender Differences and the Mediating Role of Communication Styles). An online survey was administered to college students. The perception of social support by men is lower when precision is low; low verbal aggression and high emotionality are related to low social anxiety among women. Individuals who experience social anxiety may find that therapy provides an environment where they can develop skills in communicating and increasing perceived social support through their use(Barnett, et al., 2021).

Communication differs by sex; Habits and gestures lose in the translation between genders

Summary

You can’t deny it – men and women listen differently, speak differently, and have different ways of building relationships. Socialization and upbringing play a part in this. There is still a gender gap at work. Kay Francis shows how women can close it. It trains people to recognize their own and their colleagues’ gender biases and how to circumvent them through its Fort Lauderdale, Fla., based company, Steps Beyond Enterprises. She wants to make companies more productive by getting people to work together more effectively. According to Francis, combatting gender bias starts by identifying one’s own biases(LORE CROGHAN, 1993).

CRAP analysis

This newspaper article has been published in 1993. This article is having the oldest information. By the oldest information we can get and ensure about the information, which is unavailable or available in lower quantity. LORE CROGHAN, K. is recently writer at Brooklyn Eagle, he is from New Rochelle, New York, United States. This newspaper article states, about (Communication differs by sex; Habits and gestures lose in the translation between genders). According to this article, men and women listen differently, speak differently, and have different ways of building relationships. Socialization and upbringing play a part in this. There is still a gender gap at work. Kay Francis shows how women can close it (LORE CROGHAN, 1993).

Gender audit – to make tangible worse stereotypes in online communication

Summary

Psychological and linguistic research indicates that genders are still perceived as stereotypical, with fixed associations of meaning in conversations, texts and other types of communication. Offer a keyword-based gender audit based on the evidence of online communication. Psychologist and linguist studies demonstrate that within oral and textual communication, gender is seen as a fixed relation with distinct meanings (Burel, 2018). It aims to identify reliable patterns for a keyword-based audit of gender-related communication online and determine how gender-related terminology appears in online communication. Despite the fact that gender stereotypes still persist in medical texts and emails, this thesis has not been sufficiently empirically verified, due in part to the fact that linguistics have been largely ignored in many genders and media research studies.

CRAP analysis

This web resources article has been published in 2018. This article is having the updated information. By the updated information we can get and ensure the latest versions of information. As much the information is updated as it will be easy for the readers to gain knowledge from this source. Burel, S. is a famous writer. This web resource states, about (Gender audit – to make tangible worse stereotypes in online communication), it aims to identify reliable patterns for a keyword-based audit of gender-related communication online and determine how gender-related terminology appears in online communication. Despite the fact that gender stereotypes still persist in medical texts and emails, this thesis has not been sufficiently empirically verified, due in part to the fact that linguistics have been largely ignored in many genders and media research studies (Burel, 2018).

References

Barnett, M. D., Maciel, I. V., Johnson, D. M., &Ciepluch, I. (2021). Social Anxiety and Perceived Social Support: Gender Differences and the Mediating Role of Communication Styles. Psychological Reports, 124(1), 70–87. https://doi.org/10.1177/0033294119900975

Burel, S. (2018). Gender audit: linguistic approach to gender stereotypes in online communication. Proceedings of the 4th Conference on Gender & It, 59–61. https://doi.org/10.1145/3196839.3196849

LORE CROGHAN, K. (1993, Jul 17). Communication differs by sex; Habits and gestures lose in the translation between genders: [Final Edition]. Edmonton Journal http://libaccess.senecacollege.ca/login?url=https://www.proquest.com/newspapers/communication-differs-sex-habits-gestures-lose/docview/251930007/se-2?accountid=28610