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MGT502

Introduction

For managers of business organisations, contact is important so that the organisational roles and obligations can work properly. The outbreak of the new coronaviral disease COVID-19 was declared to be an international public health emergency by the World Health Organisation (WHO). WHO has reported that COVID-19 is extremely risky to spread to other nations worldwide. WHO assessed in March 2020 that the pandemic could be identified as COVID-19. But the whole people are stressed at this time of crisis. The WHO Department of Mental Health and Consumer Usage has established the factors in this paper as a set of message that can be used for interactions in various target populations to promote mental and psychosocial wellness during the outbreak.

This report will tell about the effect of corona virus pandemic on the mental health of employs and the student. 

Impact on Mental Health of Employees and Students

Feeling under pressure for students and many of employees is a likely experience. In the current situation, it’s very natural to feel this way. Stress and emotions are not mirrored in persons inability to do job or their weakness. It’s just as necessary to control psychosocial and mental wellbeing during this point as to control physical health (Fisher, et., al. 2020). 

At this time take care of yourself. Individual should try to use effective coping mechanisms such as maintaining proper rest to rest at work or during shifts. They should eat enough nutritious food, engage in physical activities and keep in touch with friends and family. Individuals must stop using unhelpful coping measures such as tobacco smoking , alcohol use, etc (Fisher, et., al. 2020). This can exacerbate physical and mental health in the long term. The COVID-19 outbreak is unique and unprecedented for many staff and students , particularly if they did not react in a similar way. 

Unfortunately, some health workers can be discouraged by their families or communities because of stigma or fear (Fisher, et., al. 2020). This can make a situation even more complicated already. Staying close to family is one way of maintaining communication with your loved ones, even by digital methods. Turn your friends, boss or other trusted people to social help –friends can experience you in the same way. Using meaningful ways of engaging with people with intellectual, cognitive and psycho-social impairments. Include contact forms that do not rely on written information alone, wherever possible (Fisher, et., al. 2020).

Mental health & COVID-19

Fear, concern, and stress are natural responses to actual or perceived threats and, often, human face confusion or unknown factors. It is therefore natural and understandable that in the sense of the COVID-19 pandemic people are feeling fear (Yao, et., al. 2020). 

In addition to the fear of pandemics such as COVID-19, the main improvements in everyday lives are minimal, as movements help to control the spread of the virus. In view of new conditions such as homework, temporary unemployment, children’s home education and lack of physical interaction with other members of our families , colleagues, and associates, our minds as well as our physical health must be taken into consideration (Yao, et., al. 2020).

Such closures are a lack of access to services, typically accessible through schools, for children or adolescents with mental health needs. 83% indicated that the pandemic had worsened their situation in a survey carried out by Young Minds, an organisation which included 2111 participants under the age of 25 who have a history of mental illness in the UK. 26% said that they could not obtain help to mental health; peer groups and face-to – face programmes were cancelled and mobile or online help for a number of young people can prove difficult (Rajkumar, et., al. 2020).

Not much is known about the long-term mental health effect on children and staff of large-scale disease outbreaks. While some research is being conducted on the psychological impact of extreme ARS on both patients and healthcare staff, the impact on average people are not much understood (Rajkumar, et., al. 2020). Evidence in children and teenagers in particular is scarce. “This is a major research void,” Au said. COVID-19 is much larger than SARS and other global epidemics. In the course of the pandemic, it is important to promote the deprivation of children and adolescents and issues related to child unemployment or household income loss. It is also important to track the psychological status of young people in the longer term and research the impact of extended school closures and strict social distance-reducing interventions and the pandemic on children and adolescents (Chen, et., al. 2020).

Staff and Students: how to cope with job tension and improve resilience throughout the pandemic COVID-19 

The COVID-19 pandemic undoubtedly changed the way the person work, whether they go out to work or are working or from home (Carmassi, et., al. 2020). This new condition and other intense emotions can lead to extreme fear and anxiety and tension at work. How students and staff deal with these feelings and pressures will have an effect on well-being, workplaces and the society they care about. During this pandemic, understanding the stress, taking measures to create resilience and managing work stress and knowing where to go if support is required is essential (Carmassi, et., al. 2020).

How universities can assist students with Covid-19 mental health crisis 

It is the recognition of risk students that is the most significant starting point. There are some factors that can help us know what these students are, but when operating remotely, these factors need to be adapted (Moreno, et., al. 2020). 

For instance, can you say who did not register for online lectures, so who stopped participating? Who is worried about the lack of time limits or has applied for mitigation? If you do not have a system of learning management, I would recommend that academics create their own system that track this information and that the university should find a way to track how students attend online courses (Moreno, et., al. 2020). 

It’s important to know which students you’ve spoken about your mental health. Often recognise caregivers or students who are alien to their families or who cannot return home due to travel problems (Ratten, et., al. 2020).

Finally, allow students and teachers to talk to someone after coping with a dangerous student for debriefing. Make sure staff and students know how to contact a reassuring chat or email in the student service departments of the university after having approached the students (Ratten, et., al. 2020). 

In addition, staff and educators can hold daily meetings in order to provide emotional support. Remember it’s going to be impossible to look after someone else if you don’t care after yourself. Both of us are in an unusual and strange time, so it’s all right to not always get the right answer and ask for help from colleagues (Ratten, et., al. 2020).

Recommendations for Staff and Students

Share and take official advice from reliable sources from

  • England Public Health 
  • Scottish health and safety 
  • The Wales Public Health 
  • Encourage staff not to exchange details on the virus unnecessarily. There is a lot of speculation that should be spread in the world only papers from credible sources. 

Talk to yourself and your loved ones

  • You should retain frequent everyday contact, probably with your staff-both the general public and managers and supervisors. 
  • Try to be honest and begin by understanding the vulnerability and tension that it entails. Be ready to say that you don’t know and that you’re back with answers to strangers. 
  • Whether people are at work or at home, this is significant. Make sure that you interact with line managers in accordance with daily contact with all workers.

Everyone’s mental wellbeing-remember the overall effect 

We also have a mental wellbeing that can influence how we feel about ourselves and the world we live in, whatever the circumstances. Good work is great for our mental wellbeing and the ability to benefit from work wherever we can is significant. 

Some individuals are at higher risk of mental illness. Consider how the response impact the safety of workers (sex, age , disability , ethnicity, sexual orientation) or any other challenges (e.g. how Asian or Italian people may face discriminatory behaviour). Try to work, first and foremost in order to maintain the staff’s physical and psychological wellbeing.

Notice that vulnerability has multiple faces 

There is a lot of talk in connexion with coronavirus of physical vulnerabilities. However, senior managers often feel insecure in rare situations to show leadership. Enable each other to remain motivated and remind each other of how much work they do. 

For people with pre-existing or previous mental health issues, this may be especially difficult. Staying at home can lead people who have had depression or trauma to memories of bad times. Know your people and do a bit more about those who are more insecure when you see their actions changing. 

This may contribute to people disclosing mental health issues they have not addressed before in the workplace. Provide respect and compassion for new disclosures and make adaptations.

Encourage access to help 

If you do, make sure that these are well informed and find out that relevant services related to your outbreak are available via your work place. 

Make sure people know where they are going and who they are talking with internally. If you have advocates, supporters or first aid workers in mental health, make sure they have the latest information, and if you change work practises, this network of help for mental health continues if possible. 

Encourage the growth and self-care of people 

Encourage the people to prepare how they will handle themselves or quarantine. Consult our regularly updated guidance and urge individuals to speak to line managers on their plans. If people are at home, they remain socially disconnected or self-segregated by symptoms.

References

Carmassi, C., Foghi, C., Dell’Oste, V., Cordone, A., Bertelloni, C. A., Bui, E., & Dell’Osso, L. (2020). PTSD symptoms in healthcare workers facing the three coronavirus outbreaks: What can we expect after the COVID-19 pandemic. Psychiatry research, 113312.

Chen, Q., Liang, M., Li, Y., Guo, J., Fei, D., Wang, L., … & Wang, J. (2020). Mental health care for medical staff in China during the COVID-19 outbreak. The Lancet Psychiatry7(4), e15-e16.

Fisher, C. B., Tao, X., & Yip, T. (2020). The Effects of Coronavirus Victimization Distress and Coronavirus Racial Bias on Mental Health Among Black, Indigenous and Latinx Young Adults in the United States. medRxiv.

Moreno, C., Wykes, T., Galderisi, S., Nordentoft, M., Crossley, N., Jones, N., … & Chen, E. Y. (2020). How mental health care should change as a consequence of the COVID-19 pandemic. The Lancet Psychiatry.

Rajkumar, R. P. (2020). COVID-19 and mental health: A review of the existing literature. Asian journal of psychiatry, 102066.

Ratten, V. (2020). Coronavirus (Covid-19) and the entrepreneurship education community. Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy.

Yao, H., Chen, J. H., & Xu, Y. F. (2020). Patients with mental health disorders in the COVID-19 epidemic. The Lancet Psychiatry7(4), e21.

Introduction

For managers of business organisations, contact is important so that the organisational roles and obligations can work properly. The outbreak of the new coronaviral disease COVID-19 was declared to be an international public health emergency by the World Health Organisation (WHO). WHO has reported that COVID-19 is extremely risky to spread to other nations worldwide. WHO assessed in March 2020 that the pandemic could be identified as COVID-19. But the whole people are stressed at this time of crisis. The WHO Department of Mental Health and Consumer Usage has established the factors in this paper as a set of message that can be used for interactions in various target populations to promote mental and psychosocial wellness during the outbreak.

This report will tell about the effect of corona virus pandemic on the mental health of employs and the student. 

Annotated Bibliography 

Journal 1

Fisher, C. B., Tao, X., & Yip, T. (2020). The Effects of Coronavirus Victimization Distress and Coronavirus Racial Bias on Mental Health Among Black, Indigenous and Latinx Young Adults in the United States. medRxiv.

According to the Jornal written by Fisher, et., al. 2020 the feeling under pressure for students and many of employees is a likely experience. In the current situation, it’s very natural to feel this way. Stress and emotions are not mirrored in persons inability to do job or their weakness. It’s just as necessary to control psychosocial and mental wellbeing during this point as to control physical health (Fisher, et., al. 2020). 

At this time take care of yourself. Individual should try to use effective coping mechanisms such as maintaining proper rest to rest at work or during shifts. They should eat enough nutritious food, engage in physical activities and keep in touch with friends and family. Individuals must stop using unhelpful coping measures such as tobacco smoking , alcohol use, etc (Fisher, et., al. 2020). This can exacerbate physical and mental health in the long term. The COVID-19 outbreak is unique and unprecedented for many staff and students , particularly if they did not react in a similar way. 

Unfortunately, some health workers can be discouraged by their families or communities because of stigma or fear (Fisher, et., al. 2020). This can make a situation even more complicated already. Staying close to family is one way of maintaining communication with your loved ones, even by digital methods. Turn your friends, boss or other trusted people to social help –friends can experience you in the same way. Using meaningful ways of engaging with people with intellectual, cognitive and psycho-social impairments. Include contact forms that do not rely on written information alone, wherever possible (Fisher, et., al. 2020).

Journal 2

Yao, H., Chen, J. H., & Xu, Y. F. (2020). Patients with mental health disorders in the COVID-19 epidemic. The Lancet Psychiatry7(4), e21.

According to this Journal; fear, concern, and stress are natural responses to actual or perceived threats and, often, human face confusion or unknown factors. It is therefore natural and understandable that in the sense of the COVID-19 pandemic people are feeling fear (Yao, et., al. 2020). 

In addition to the fear of pandemics such as COVID-19, the main improvements in everyday lives are minimal, as movements help to control the spread of the virus. In view of new conditions such as homework, temporary unemployment, children’s home education and lack of physical interaction with other members of our families , colleagues, and associates, our minds as well as our physical health must be taken into consideration (Yao, et., al. 2020).

Such closures are a lack of access to services, typically accessible through schools, for children or adolescents with mental health needs. 83% indicated that the pandemic had worsened their situation in a survey carried out by Young Minds, an organisation which included 2111 participants under the age of 25 who have a history of mental illness in the UK. 26% said that they could not obtain help to mental health; peer groups and face-to – face programmes were cancelled and mobile or online help for a number of young people can prove difficult (Rajkumar, et., al. 2020).

Not much is known about the long-term mental health effect on children and staff of large-scale disease outbreaks. While some research is being conducted on the psychological impact of extreme ARS on both patients and healthcare staff, the impact on average people are not much understood (Rajkumar, et., al. 2020). Evidence in children and teenagers in particular is scarce. “This is a major research void,” Au said. COVID-19 is much larger than SARS and other global epidemics. In the course of the pandemic, it is important to promote the deprivation of children and adolescents and issues related to child unemployment or household income loss. It is also important to track the psychological status of young people in the longer term and research the impact of extended school closures and strict social distance-reducing interventions and the pandemic on children and adolescents (Chen, et., al. 2020).

Journal 3

Carmassi, C., Foghi, C., Dell’Oste, V., Cordone, A., Bertelloni, C. A., Bui, E., & Dell’Osso, L. (2020). PTSD symptoms in healthcare workers facing the three coronavirus outbreaks: What can we expect after the COVID-19 pandemic. Psychiatry research, 113312.

This journal is based on how Staff and Students cope with job tension and improve resilience throughout the pandemic COVID-19. The COVID-19 pandemic undoubtedly changed the way the person work, whether they go out to work or are working or from home (Carmassi, et., al. 2020). This new condition and other intense emotions can lead to extreme fear and anxiety and tension at work. How students and staff deal with these feelings and pressures will have an effect on well-being, workplaces and the society they care about. During this pandemic, understanding the stress, taking measures to create resilience and managing work stress and knowing where to go if support is required is essential (Carmassi, et., al. 2020).

Journal 4

Moreno, C., Wykes, T., Galderisi, S., Nordentoft, M., Crossley, N., Jones, N., … & Chen, E. Y. (2020). How mental health care should change as a consequence of the COVID-19 pandemic. The Lancet Psychiatry.

This journal explains the way universities can assist students with Covid-19 mental health crisis. It is the recognition of risk students that is the most significant starting point. There are some factors that can help us know what these students are, but when operating remotely, these factors need to be adapted (Moreno, et., al. 2020). 

For instance, can you say who did not register for online lectures, so who stopped participating? Who is worried about the lack of time limits or has applied for mitigation? If you do not have a system of learning management, I would recommend that academics create their own system that track this information and that the university should find a way to track how students attend online courses (Moreno, et., al. 2020). 

It’s important to know which students you’ve spoken about your mental health. Often recognise caregivers or students who are alien to their families or who cannot return home due to travel problems (Moreno, et., al. 2020).

Finally, allow students and teachers to talk to someone after coping with a dangerous student for debriefing. Make sure staff and students know how to contact a reassuring chat or email in the student service departments of the university after having approached the students (Moreno, et., al. 2020). 

In addition, staff and educators can hold daily meetings in order to provide emotional support. Remember it’s going to be impossible to look after someone else if you don’t care after yourself. Both of us are in an unusual and strange time, so it’s all right to not always get the right answer and ask for help from colleagues (Moreno, et., al. 2020).

Recommendations for Staff and Students

Share and take official advice from reliable sources from

  • England Public Health 
  • Scottish health and safety 
  • The Wales Public Health 
  • Encourage staff not to exchange details on the virus unnecessarily. There is a lot of speculation that should be spread in the world only papers from credible sources. 

Talk to yourself and your loved ones

  • You should retain frequent everyday contact, probably with your staff-both the general public and managers and supervisors. 
  • Try to be honest and begin by understanding the vulnerability and tension that it entails. Be ready to say that you don’t know and that you’re back with answers to strangers. 
  • Whether people are at work or at home, this is significant. Make sure that you interact with line managers in accordance with daily contact with all workers.

Everyone’s mental wellbeing-remember the overall effect 

We also have a mental wellbeing that can influence how we feel about ourselves and the world we live in, whatever the circumstances. Good work is great for our mental wellbeing and the ability to benefit from work wherever we can is significant. 

Some individuals are at higher risk of mental illness. Consider how the response impact the safety of workers (sex, age , disability , ethnicity, sexual orientation) or any other challenges (e.g. how Asian or Italian people may face discriminatory behaviour). Try to work, first and foremost in order to maintain the staff’s physical and psychological wellbeing.

Notice that vulnerability has multiple faces 

There is a lot of talk in connexion with coronavirus of physical vulnerabilities. However, senior managers often feel insecure in rare situations to show leadership. Enable each other to remain motivated and remind each other of how much work they do. 

For people with pre-existing or previous mental health issues, this may be especially difficult. Staying at home can lead people who have had depression or trauma to memories of bad times. Know your people and do a bit more about those who are more insecure when you see their actions changing. 

This may contribute to people disclosing mental health issues they have not addressed before in the workplace. Provide respect and compassion for new disclosures and make adaptations.

Encourage access to help 

If you do, make sure that these are well informed and find out that relevant services related to your outbreak are available via your work place. 

Make sure people know where they are going and who they are talking with internally. If you have advocates, supporters or first aid workers in mental health, make sure they have the latest information, and if you change work practises, this network of help for mental health continues if possible. 

Encourage the growth and self-care of people 

Encourage the people to prepare how they will handle themselves or quarantine. Consult our regularly updated guidance and urge individuals to speak to line managers on their plans. If people are at home, they remain socially disconnected or self-segregated by symptoms.

References

Fisher, C. B., Tao, X., & Yip, T. (2020). The Effects of Coronavirus Victimization Distress and Coronavirus Racial Bias on Mental Health Among Black, Indigenous and Latinx Young Adults in the United States. medRxiv.

Yao, H., Chen, J. H., & Xu, Y. F. (2020). Patients with mental health disorders in the COVID-19 epidemic. The Lancet Psychiatry7(4), e21.

Rajkumar, R. P. (2020). COVID-19 and mental health: A review of the existing literature. Asian journal of psychiatry, 102066.

Chen, Q., Liang, M., Li, Y., Guo, J., Fei, D., Wang, L., … & Wang, J. (2020). Mental health care for medical staff in China during the COVID-19 outbreak. The Lancet Psychiatry7(4), e15-e16.

Carmassi, C., Foghi, C., Dell’Oste, V., Cordone, A., Bertelloni, C. A., Bui, E., & Dell’Osso, L. (2020). PTSD symptoms in healthcare workers facing the three coronavirus outbreaks: What can we expect after the COVID-19 pandemic. Psychiatry research, 113312.

Moreno, C., Wykes, T., Galderisi, S., Nordentoft, M., Crossley, N., Jones, N., … & Chen, E. Y. (2020). How mental health care should change as a consequence of the COVID-19 pandemic. The Lancet Psychiatry.

Ratten, V. (2020). Coronavirus (Covid-19) and the entrepreneurship education community. Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy.

  1. Goldman, G.A., Nienaber, H. and Pretorius, M., (2015). THE ESSENCE OF THE CONTEMPORARY BUSINESS ORGANIZATION: A CRITICAL REFLECTION. Journal of Global Business & Technology, 11(2) https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/0ba5/299f6a24031bf587edeb1a6aa1d2453ad858.pdf

The Researchers of the critique are on or after the University of Johannesburg in which they provide the lectures in History and philosophy of management. The audience for the writer  examined the different factors which constitute the distortion of ontological position that exist in the business organisations. By analyzing this paper with other, it would be  asserted that this paper provide a reflection on the business organisation . the other signifies the effects of unsuccessful communication among the medical officer. The topic of contemporary business organisations has been linked or selected to rethink the concept of business organisations and also meet the hurdles that can be posed by the different stakeholders. The scope of this article is a critical dialectic approach and confront the aim of natural status of  institution, organisation and management. 

  1. Maurice Odine (2015). Communication Problems in Management. Journal of Emerging Issues in Economics, Finance and Banking (JEIEFB) An Online International Research Journal, 4(2). http://globalbizresearch.org/economics/images/files/54946_ID_S528_JEIEFB_Maurice%20Odine.pdf

In this article the author is the Dean associate in school of journalism and graphic communication, USA. There are workers in the who are working in the organisations are considered as the audiences. After comparing the different papers, it can be observed that there is an issue in  effective communication in organisations. The other paper stress on the different problems of message at  different departments like in health sector, manufacturing industry. But this paper is related with the department of management in firms. It is connected as it identifies the different causes of communication and also provides certain barriers in respect to communication. This paper has wide scope as it provides the various outcomes for the problem of   communication. In addition to this, it specifies the different process of communication that helps to attain the objective. 

  1. Xie, E., & Redding, K. S. (2018). State-owned enterprises in the contemporary global business scenario: introduction. International Journal of Public Sector Management, 31(2), 98-112. https://www.emerald.com/insight/content/doi/10.1108/IJPSM-01-2018-0015/full/html

In this paper the author belongs from the School of management and Economics, china. The audience gain the knowledge regarding the state-owned enterprises in the scenario of global business. After observing the different articles, it can be determined that this paper has been focused on the scenario of enterprises. While the other paper emphasis on the process of communication. This paper linked with the different sectors such as public transport , space in different countries. It also provide the deep knowledge of growth stratageies  and the performance of state owned enterprise. The scope of this paper is very vast it covers the different theory such as managerial grid theory, agency theory, exchange theory etc. 

  1. Gamil, Y. and Rahman I. A. (2018). Identification of Causes and Effects of Poor Communication in Construction Industry: A Theoretical Review.Emerging Science Journal, 1(4). https://www.researchgate.net/publication/322679807_Identification_of_Causes_and_Effects_of_Poor_Communication_in_Construction_Industry_A_Theoretical_Review

In this article the authors belongs to the university of  Malaysia from the university Tun Hussein and faculty of civil and Environmental Engineering. The audience are in the form of different industries which involve the different parties. These industries are dynamic, complex and fragmented in nature. Although analyzing this  paper, from the other, it can be identified that the paper signifies the communication problem in construction industry and the other has different issue in different sector. It can be determined that construction factory initiate the project and develop the successful and efficient communication in the sector and that is the major scope for the industry. It also  provides the different measures to minimize the effect and cause factors as the construction industry faces the challenges due to changing nature and diversity.

  1. Türkel, S., & Akan, A. (2015). Corporate social responsibility (CSR) communication: a Turkish industry example. In Integrated communications in the postmodern era (pp. 151-174) Palgrave Macmillan, London. https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1057/9781137388551_7

In this critique, the researchers are from the London and publish their article from the palgrave Macmillan , London. In this the researcher focuses on the concept of corporate social responsibility and provides an example of Turkish industry. By observing the other critique, it can be assumed that in this the author has provide an empirical study which is based on the communication of CSR activities. The other critique is based on the strategies of CSR communication for legitimacy in the field of social media. It scope extends to the different models of CSR and also provide the pyramid of CSR . It also provides the different tools that help to provide the true information about the brand of company of its operations.  

  1. Golob, U., Elving, W. J., Nielsen, A. E., Thomsen, C., Schultz, F., Podnar, K., & Colleoni, E. (2013). CSR communication strategies for organizational legitimacy in social media. Corporate Communications: an international journal. https://www.emerald.com/insight/content/doi/10.1108/13563281311319508/full/html

In this the researcher belongs to the Department of management and intercultural communication, Copenhagen , Denmark. This research paper was published on 24 April , 2013. It consist of different organisations of business and that can be termed as the audiences. Although , observing the other articles, it can be noted that this research paper is based on the different strategies of communication for legitimacy of organisation in field of media. On the other side the other paper , provides an example of Turkish industry with the help of CSR. It also linked  the business organisations with the today’s environment. It scope applies to the techniques of data-mining that allows assessment of different information which aare provided online. In addition to this, the main aim of this paper is to examine the stragey of communication that are followed in the line of social media and that is more effective to establish the union among the CSR and stakeholders. 

  1. Fay, N., & Ellison, T. M. (2013). The cultural evolution of human communication systems in different sized populations: usability trumps learnability. PloS one, 8(8), e71781. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3744464/

The backdrop of the author is from perth, and belongs to the school of psychology, University of western Australia. The audiences investigate the evolution of system of human communication and how they leads to the reproduction fidelity and efficiency. Although comparing with the paper, this paper emphasis on the intergenerational transfers system of human communication and how it impacts the size of population. The other critique involve the bootstrapped  of communication system in absence of different language. It also proposed the selection of content bias and that includes the coding and signs and that provides information in easy manner. In addition to this, it scope extends to the experimental approach and evolve the different generations. It also stress on the size of population on the evolution of communication system in human beings. 

  1. Fay, N., Arbib, M., & Garrod, S. (2013). How to bootstrap a human communication system. Cognitive science, 37(7), 1356-1367.https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epdf/10.1111/cogs.12048

The researcher of this paper are belongs from different universities such as School of Psychology, Western Australia. Department of Psychology, University of Glasgow. In this critique individual works through acts and gestures and that can be evaluated which are recognised as the audience. Although differentiating this paper from the other, it is based on the human beings as compare to the different sectors and the communication system use the signs to obtain the information. The other research paper is based on evolution of human communication with different population. The main purpose of this research paper is  analyse the human communication system in absence of language which is conventional in nature. It also stress on the acts and gestures which are efficient and effective as compare to the other form of communication. 

  1. Curtis, J. R., Back, A. L., Ford, D. W., Downey, L., Shannon, S. E., Doorenbos, A. Z., … & Arnold, R. W. (2013). Effect of communication skills training for residents and nurse practitioners on quality of communication with patients with serious illness: a randomized trial. Jama310(21), 2271-2281. https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/article-abstract/1787407

In this research paper the researcher are the faculties of the medical department or department of Health and safety in various institutions. The patients, trainees or medical practitioners are considers as the audience in this paper. While stating, about the comparison, this research deals with the different methods of information and its effect on the Nurse practitioners and residents in respect to the quality of communication. The main objective of this research paper is to analyse the different effects of the skills of communication for practitioner and internal medicine on the result of family report. It scope extend to the different participants and practitioner between the period of 2007- 2013 in south California. It does not improve the quality of communication in the end of life care system.  

  1. Verma, R., Gustafsson, A., Kristensson, P., &Witell, L. (2012). Customer cocreation in service innovation: a matter of communication?. Journal of service management .https://www.emerald.com/insight/content/doi/10.1108/09564231211248426/full/html

This research article is published on the 22 june 2012 and faculties are from the different institutions. They belongs to the Research center, Karlstad University , Norwegian and service Research Center, Sweden. It consist the different organisations and target customer and that will be the audience . It differentiate with the other article, as the other research paper stressed on the skills of communication and its affects in different areas. But this paper focus on the co-creation of customer in the innovation of service sector and a matter of communication. It also asserts the four dimensions of the communication that is direction, modality, frequency and the content. The goal of this journal article is to improve the relation of customer in the field of service sector . it also examines the various factors that affects the services and products in the competitive world. It also suggested that the innovation and co-creation should be combined and the co-creation depends on the different innovations. It also receives the experience in terms of services and products and that tends to the satisfaction of customer and helps to attain the goal. 

References

Curtis, J. R., Back, A. L., Ford, D. W., Downey, L., Shannon, S. E., Doorenbos, A. Z., … & Arnold, R. W. (2013). Effect of communication skills training for residents and nurse practitioners on quality of communication with patients with serious illness: a randomized trial. Jama310(21), 2271-2281

Fay, N., & Ellison, T. M. (2013). The cultural evolution of human communication systems in different sized populations: usability trumps learnability. PloS one, 8(8), e71781.

Fay, N., Arbib, M., & Garrod, S. (2013). How to bootstrap a human communication system. Cognitive science, 37(7), 1356-1367

Gamil, Y. and Rahman I. A. (2018). Identification of Causes and Effects of Poor Communication in Construction Industry: A Theoretical Review.Emerging Science Journal, 1(4).

Goldman, G.A., Nienaber, H. and Pretorius, M., (2015). THE ESSENCE OF THE CONTEMPORARY BUSINESS ORGANIZATION: A CRITICAL REFLECTION. Journal of Global Business & Technology, 11(2)

Golob, U., Elving, W. J., Nielsen, A. E., Thomsen, C., Schultz, F., Podnar, K., & Colleoni, E. (2013). CSR communication strategies for organizational legitimacy in social media. Corporate Communications: an international journal.

Maurice Odine (2015). Communication Problems in Management. Journal of Emerging Issues in Economics, Finance and Banking (JEIEFB) An Online International Research Journal, 4(2).

Türkel, S., & Akan, A. (2015). Corporate social responsibility (CSR) communication: a Turkish industry example. In Integrated communications in the postmodern era (pp. 151-174)

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